.
Release September 16, 2023

Meet The Authors

Q1. Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Bronwyn Davis. I am a master’s prepared and board certified Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and a licensed EACM minister. I am the Founder & Executive Director of A Safe Place Clinical Counseling, PLLC. I am also a member of the Michigan Mental Health Counselors Association
(MMHCA).

Q2. What is the name of your Chapter in God’s Compassion Towards Me?
My chapter title is “Not Good Enough.”

3. What is the message of your chapter?
The message of my chapter is that feeling not good enough is something that both men and women experience. The challenge with this is that unfortunately, when self-doubt, comparison or insecurities are replayed, a person has to believe that they can work beyond their negative belief system to reach their potential. Some of the greatest people have battled with this, but in time learned to conquer with great success.

4. What takeaway do you want to leave with the readers?
You are good enough! God created you. You are fearfully and wonderfully made. Though life may have unexpected turns, experiences and curve balls, no matter what you, you are created to be all that God called you to be!

Q1. Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Dr. Lisa Brooks. I am a Licensed Psychologist and Certified Advanced Clinical Addictions Counselor. I am a Licensed Minister of the gospel, friend and motivator. I hold a Doctorate in Ministry.
Q2. What is the name of your chapter in God’s Compassion Toward’s Me?
My chapter is entitled “Destruction of the Soul.”
Q3. What is the message of your chapter?
The message of my chapter is this, “God can and He will heal you if you let Him.” The enemy of our soul is out to destroy. As stated in John 10:10 the enemy comes to kill steal and destroy. God has come that we might have life, and have it more abundantly. As those chosen to set the captives free, we endeavor by the grace of God to enlighten those who are bound to the deceptions of the enemy and empower them to become free. This may not come in the way you expect but God will do it, maybe medication, psychiatrist or deliverance minister but God is a healer.
Q4. What take away do you want to leave with the readers?
I want reader to understand that no matter what state you find yourself in, God is faithful. There are men and women of God who have been anointed and appointed to help you achieve your freedom with God’s help. Don’t give up. God’s help is available to you.
Q1: Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Courtney Cabell. I am a third-year doctoral student at the Michigan School of Psychology and a licensed psychotherapist and psychometrician. I also hold a host a leadership roles in professional psychological organizations including the Association of Black Psychologists Student Circle, Psi Chi, the Inclusion Diversity and Equity Alliance, the Society for Humanistic Psychology, and the Michigan Psychological Association.
Q2: What is the name of your Chapter in God’s Compassion Towards Me?
My chapter is titled “Inner Turmoil.”
Q3: What is the message of your chapter?
The message of my chapter is that every individual experiences inner turmoil, even mental health care providers. Our experiences of inner turmoil do not define us and the pain is temporary when you have faith.
Q4: What take away do you want to leave with the readers?
I want readers to understand that inner turmoil is a part of the human experience, but through faith and trust in God, the distress may be overcome.
Q1: Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Dr. Hellen Njoroge. I am a clinical psychologist and Judicial Mediator. I am the founder of Jali Centre, a mental health organization focusing on the well-being and health of women, children, and families.
Q2: What is the name of your Chapter in God’s Compassion Towards Me?
My chapter is titled “God’s Compassion on Me.”
Q3: What is the message of your chapter?
The compassion of God is evident in our lives. It takes our faith to tap into His compassion and listen keenly to His voice.

Q1. Who are you and what do you do?     

My name is Dr. Chlorine Forest Wimberly. I am a psychotherapist who uses Talk Therapy to treat clients/people who are experiencing emotional problems and mental illness to manage general emotional unrest, trauma, grief and other mental health disorders.                                                           

Q2. What is the name of your Chapter in God’s Compassion Towards Me?                                     

The name of my chapter is, “IT’S NEVER TOO LATE.”                                                                   

Q3. What is the message of your chapter?         

The message of my chapter is that you can recover from emotional hurts and pains that stems from Domestic Violence as well as forgive those individuals who experienced inner turmoil, embrace who God has called you to be and know ‘”IT’S NEVER TOO LATE.” 

Q4. What takeaway do you want to leave with the readers?                                                              

I want readers to understand that domestic violence may be part of our experience, part of the journey, but it is not YOU. You can be healthy and whole through Christ who, “strengthen you.” (Philippians 4:13) and know IT’S NEVER TOO LATE.

Q1: Who are you and what do you do?
My name is Dr. Lisa H. Fuller. I am the Founder, CEO, and Chief Medical Officer and Psychiatrist of Discern Life Consultants Health as well as CEO of Learn Realistic Habits for the Future and Pastor/ Overseer of Christ’s Arms Reaching Everywhere Ministries and Lisa H. Fuller Ministries.

Q2: Where did the idea for God’s Compassion Towards Me come from?
God placed it in my spirit. The goal is to break down barriers and stigmas associated with mental illness and let people know: “It is okay to receive mental health treatment.”
Several people who experience mental illness may never receive treatment. Mental illness can worsen over time to the point the effects devastate one’s life if not addressed resulting in broken relationships, job termination due to reduced and unmet productivity, social isolation/ loneliness, health challenges (reduced immunity, ending remission of terminal illnesses, headaches, fatigue), addictions, sleep disturbances, appetite changes, suicidal thoughts, and completed suicide resulting in death.